Why You’re Important

Connection

I could go on for pages and pages about reasons why you, one single human being in a world of over 7 billion people, are pivotal to the human race. But I think it will have more of an impact if I go with a more local approach.

Consider all of the people you run into every day, the people you pass by without giving them a second thought, the people who hand you your coffee in the morning, the people you know and love, and the strangers you meet only once and will likely never see again.

Every single one of those people is a person. Each one has a story, has had experiences you may never have, and can teach you something you don’t know. It’s true, we have access to a more-or-less infinite wealth of knowledge at all times: the internet. But there’s one thing you can’t get from the internet as readily as you can from talking to people: connection.

I know what you’re thinking:Ā this post is supposed to be about why I’M important…so far you’ve only told me why OTHER people are important. Look at yourself as one of these people, though. You have had experiences other people haven’t. You know things that other people don’t, that other people want and need to hear.

This is why I think we need to connect to people more. We need not to be afraid of getting into a conversation with a stranger that’s deeper than what the weather looks like. Ask questions, reach out to people, tell people the things you’ve learned, be a mentor to someone, share experiences.

A week or two ago I connected with Jacob, the author of thebulbculture.wordpress.com, and this morning we Skyped for about an hour, and we realized that we come from incredibly similar backgrounds, and are working toward the same things in life. And now I’m feeling more motivated and positive and powerful than I was before. I’m confident we can both teach each other something, and we can build something amazing together that will change people’s lives. Imagine if he hadn’t reached out to me.

And I just think about the impact that we will both have on people, and about what we would miss out on if he hadn’t. Two minds working and thinking and progressing together can create something much more powerful than they could independently.

So YOU are important. Jacob mentioned that a lot of people operate for themselves, on an individual level, but that it’s important to reach out, to work together, to share experiences and ideas and thoughts and stories. Connection is what makes us great. Whether you do that through The Bulb Culture, or through comments to people on WordPress, or in person, know that it’s important, that YOU are important, and that the ability to connect and create a sum greater than the parts is what makes humans incredible.

A sincere thank you to Jacob. Go check out his site, he’s an awesome guy with a whole lot of passion for helping people.

20 comments

  1. controversialcook · April 8, 2015

    Nice words, but if you live in a big unfriendly, money mad metropolis like London to try to have a conversation with people is an impossible task. Nowadays I only interact with people that smile and are open to constructive conversation, as for the rest I don’t care one bit. It’s a waste of effort and time. “Smile and the world will smile with you” says the proverb, which means if somebody doesn’t smile nor make an effort to talk to me or add a single word beyond the conventional: “Hello how are you?” They can cook in their own stew.

    Liked by 1 person

    • irrationalliving · April 8, 2015

      Everyone is entitled to their own opinions of course. I live in New York, which, arguably, is the most fast-paced, leave-me-alone city in the world. I’ve found that people create a shell on the outside that makes it seem like they don’t want to interact. But pushing beyond that shell takes very little time and is highly rewarding. I’ve had incredible conversations on subways and in Penn Station, simply because I pushed past that blockade we all put up. Behind that, there are interesting people who are more friendly than I think most people give them credit for. And you never know…people might be looking at you and thinking the same thing: “oh, all he offers is a smile and a ‘how are you,’ he must not want to talk.” If everyone thinks like that, though, there will never be any connection.

      Liked by 1 person

      • controversialcook · April 8, 2015

        Haha… New York when it comes to interacting with people is a cakewalk compared to London. Friends of mine from London that have been to New York are amazed of how open and easy to talk to are New Yorkers. In London one can spend months or years without exchanging a single word with someone else. Apart from that is a nice city. Anyway I’m extremely open and friendly more than anybody that I’ve ever met, and so they say, but even for me to interact verbally in this city is very tough, a daily struggle. Imagine how it is for others…

        Liked by 1 person

      • irrationalliving · April 8, 2015

        Wow…I’ve never heard that before. I’m surprised. But I’m sure it’s a similar situation. You may have fewer interactions, but they can certainly happen. And when they do, they make an even bigger difference in a city that so seldom sees them.

        Like

      • controversialcook · April 8, 2015

        Well you know English people especially those from the rich South have always been rather reserved, shy and class conscious. I’ve never been to the States but to me Americans seem more outgoing and open. Of course I only know them as tourists so my perception may be wrong.

        Liked by 1 person

      • irrationalliving · April 8, 2015

        Yea, and mine probably is as well. Every English person I’ve met here has been super outgoing. I guess outgoing people are the ones who tend to travel though. It’s cool hearing about different cultures and how different countries see us.

        Like

      • controversialcook · April 8, 2015

        Yes it’s true that English people that travel are more open and friendly. Also the English from the North and the Scottish are quite friendly.. I think that it’s because they have always been the poorer areas of the working class while the South has always been rich. I feel that poverty often makes people more humane, while wealth divides.

        Liked by 1 person

      • irrationalliving · April 9, 2015

        I think it has the potential to do so…but I don’t think there’s causality there. For example, there are lots of wealthy, successful people I know who are beyond friendly and who are outgoing and always open to talking to anyone. I don’t think poverty makes people humane, but we’re more likely to run into poor, friendly people because they represent a larger percentage of the population, and because we have better access to them.

        Like

      • controversialcook · April 9, 2015

        There is a proverb that says that “The problem with rich people is that they can only have rich friends.” In my life experience this has proved again and again to be so. Because of the work that I used to do throughout my life I’ve known hundreds of rich and famous people and also live in one of the richest areas in London or Europe. Yes it’s true many are nice and polite but unless you are one of them they will keep always you at a arm length, they will not let you inside their circle. Without generalizing poor people on the contrary can be very generous, open and helpful because they have nothing to loose and also because they suffer and have suffered in life while rich people live in an artificial comfortable reality created by money and fame, if they are famous There are quite a lot of rich people that give money to charity for example but their action is basically an alimony like the one given to the beggars in the streets, while famous people they do it for publicity. There is a huge difference between a wealthy person that gives, say one hundred thousand dollars or more in charity and a poor person that has only a loaf of bread and shares it with another person that has noting to eat. I’m not religious but Jesus Christ, to name one of the many sages, made several references to rich people in the parable of the rich Epulone who after enjoying his great banquets with his rich friends used to let the poor eat the crumbs that were left over from the table and in his phrase that said: “It’s easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich to enter paradise. Actually he didn’t say camel but kamel that is a Hebrew word for a thick nautical rope. As you say there are a much larger percentage of poor people than rich which begs one question Why that is so? And to be taken in consideration is the fact that the gap between the rich and the poor is getting wider and wider that is due to rich people’s greed.

        Liked by 1 person

      • irrationalliving · April 9, 2015

        Well, I just finished “Grinding It Out,” by Ray Kroc, and he says that a person who has a mentality of “where’s mine?” can never understand how another person could not think like that. Looking at celebrities giving money away and thinking they’re doing it for publicity? You find what you look for. Why would they need that publicity? They’re already rich and famous. And many of them do donate their time and money without recognition, but we don’t hear about it because they don’t publicize it. I don’t want to get into quoting scripture haha, because that’s a loooooong road to travel down, but money is not evil. Sure, there are people who are rich who are selfish and greedy, but what about the opposite? Why do you think areas with high rates of poverty have the highest rate of crime? Because there are lots and lots of poor people who are greedy too. I’m not defending the wealthy exclusively, just saying that people are people, and I think they’ll be that way regardless of how much money they have. Also, I don’t think the gap between rich and poor widening is due to rich people’s greed…the only place they can get money is from other people. They provide the most service to people, who give money in exchange.

        I do have the best conversations with you! Thanks for your thoughts, as always. I hope these responses don’t come across as hostile. Just sharing my thoughts!

        Like

  2. beamingdreaming · April 8, 2015

    This is wonderful. Thank you for showing people who don’t know that that are important, that they are on earth for a reason. Great motivater! Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • irrationalliving · April 9, 2015

      Thanks very much! I do believe everyone is majorly important šŸ™‚ and you’re very welcome! Glad you liked it.

      Like

  3. beamingdreaming · April 8, 2015

    This is great! Showing people that they do matter, what a great motivator! Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • irrationalliving · April 9, 2015

      Haha I think this might be a repeat comment, but I appreciate it all the same!! Glad you enjoyed it.

      Like

  4. beamingdreaming · April 8, 2015

    Reblogged this on beamingdreaming and commented:
    Great way to start they day!

    Liked by 1 person

    • irrationalliving · April 9, 2015

      Thanks so much for reblogging. I’m glad it had an impact on you šŸ™‚

      Like

  5. training2bewonderwoman · April 8, 2015

    I LOVE this post! You are SO right! I recently was discussing why I really like Twitter over Facebook, and it’s not only because we see news almost instantaneously, but because we connect with people outside of our circles and open our minds to new ideas.

    Liked by 1 person

    • irrationalliving · April 9, 2015

      Yes absolutely! I think it’s called SOCIAL media for a reason, because it’s meant to help connect people. And those connections feel so wonderful šŸ™‚ I’m glad you enjoyed it!

      Like

  6. thebulbculture · April 9, 2015

    I’m speechless, amazing post Dan. Thank You.

    Liked by 1 person

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